Tag: Symbology

Discovering the Sagrada Família: the portal of the Rosary

Since the beginning of October, visitors to the Sagrada Família have been able to enjoy the portal of the Rosary, a small architectural gem that Gaudí left finished in 1897 to serve as a guide for those who would continue the project after he was gone. This is particularly important for the Technical Office, which …

The pinnacles of the Evangelists: the symbolism of the tetramorph

The pinnacles, which are the top section of the towers, are always the most eye-catching, given their host of colours and symbolic elements. And the pinnacles on the towers of the Evangelists, which are modelled after the bell towers on the Nativity and Passion façades, are no exception. In fact, the fourth Temple album includes …

The Evangelists: how they are, and will be, represented at the Sagrada Família

Now that the six central towers are growing at the same pace, which is quite fast thanks in part to the tensioned-stone building technique, the time has come to talk about what will go on top of them. Blog readers already know that the pinnacle of the tower of Jesus Christ will be a four-armed …

Why is there a labyrinth at the entrance to the Sagrada Família?

Labyrinths are known to have existed since prehistory, as well as in most cultures of antiquity. They were worn as amulets or engraved in stone to ward off evil spirits, which were believed to get lost inside and not be able to find the victim. Plus, around the world, there are many churches with a …

Discovering the Sagrada Família: the window in the loge of the Coronation

At the Sagrada Família, there are many spaces and details that visitors can’t often see, whether because they are very high up and far from the street, or because they are hidden or in areas only accessible to authorised personnel. This is the case of the loges behind the sculpture groups on the Nativity façade. …

The Virgin Mary, the other protagonist of the Sagrada Família

The feast of the Immaculate Conception, on 8 December, reminds us that we are in Advent from the Sunday of Christ the King, celebrating the end of one liturgical year and the beginning of another. With Advent, preparations begin again for the arrival of the Messiah on Christmas, lighting a candle each of the four …

The columns and the liturgical calendar: study of an association

New Year’s Eve, a festivity held round the world, wasn’t always celebrated on 31 December. In Roman times, the year began in March, which is why September, October, November and December have names derived from the fact that they were the seventh, eighth, ninth and tenth months of the year. The liturgical year, however, starts …

The baldachin: representation of the Holy Spirit at the Sagrada Família

After the seven weeks of Eastertide, meaning the fifty days from Easter or Resurrection Monday to Pentecost Monday, we wanted to turn to the baldachin on the main altar, inaugurated in 2010 with the consecration of the Basilica and the clearest representation of the Holy Spirit inside the Temple. Pentecost literally means fifty days and …